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Caramelo, Rebecca, Birds of a Lesser Paradise, The Snow Child, Galore

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Caramelo_novel

Caramelo is a multi-generational family saga that revolves around Celaya, a.k.a. Lala, the only daughter in a family of sons. Her childhood is spent in Mexico, Chicago, and Texas, transversing cultures, languages, and fragmented identities. She’s a bit of a tomboy: tough, funny, but a little unsure of herself all the same. It’s only in piecing together her family’s tumultuous history that she is able to situate herself and put roots to her own experiences. I loved the way that Cisneros incorporates both English and Spanish into her prose, the way she references real historical/political events (most apparent in the narrative of The Little Grandfather’s experience in the Mexican Army), and most of all I appreciated the in-text dialogue that Lala has with The Awful Grandmother, who keeps interrupting her narrative to question her framing of things, her omitting of certain details and her emphasis of others. This is a story about how stories get told, and why, as much as it is about a particular individual, family, and community of migrants. A wonderful, thoughtful, rambling novel, full of contradictory characters, intense infatuations, and unpredictable unravellings. Fantastic!

rebecca-by-daphne-du-maurier1

Oh, Rebecca. Rebecca is just as perfect as everyone who’s ever told you to read it has promised it would be. Mrs. de Winter is the paid companion of a rich, boring socialite when she meets Maxim on vacation in Italy. In him she finds romance as well as financial stability and a way out of her dead-end present. But when she comes to Maxim’s estate, Manderley, a new bride after a rushed marriage and a short honeymoon, she feels…unsettled. She is intimidated by the housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers, who seems immediately to dislike her, and she is uncomfortable in her new role as lady of the house. She has big shoes to fill, she knows, for Maxim has been married before. And his previous wife was everything that the current Mrs. de Winter is not: confined and composed, a dark, classic beauty, the perfect hostess. In every corner of the unfamiliar house, the new Mrs. de Winter catches hints of Rebecca, and her lingering presence taunts her. Rebecca builds slowly, creepily, avoiding cliche and indulging in the most lovely descriptions, reveling in archetype. Read it on a rainy, snowy, or otherwise foreboding night.

birds-of-lesser

The stories in Birds of a Lesser Paradise populated with women who are struggling with loss, family, and questions about personal evolution and “biological destiny”. They are animal hoarders, bird watchers, veterinarians or married to veterinarians, each working to define their relationships to nature through their relationships with other animals. Bergman uses animals both captive and wild to play around with what might be parallels to her characters’ subjectivity as women working toward and against bonds of domesticity and freedom. In “Housewifely Arts”, a woman takes her son on a search for a parrot capable of mimicking her dead mother’s voice, and in another favorite of mine, “The Artificial Heart”, a woman wonders about the moral implications of life-extending technology that keeps her father alive in a semi-apocalyptic world. Some of Bergman’s characters were repetitious, while others felt more satirical than real (I’m thinking of the anti-population growth activist/husband in “Yesterday’s Whales”). Regardless, each story in this collection arced gracefully and gave me something lasting and multi-layered to think about. I thoroughly enjoyed these stories and eagerly await future releases from Bergman!

Ivey_TheSnowChildmoon

Though a very different reading experience, The Snow Child  in some way fits thematically with Birds of a Lesser Paradise. Craving a change of scenery following a terrible, personal tragedy, Mabel and Jack become early settlers of the Alaskan frontier. They fight against the cold, the brutality of the land and their surroundings, and growing emotional distance. One blistery night in the middle of winter, they build themselves a child out of snow, and shortly thereafter begin to see a young girl alone in the woods. Familiar with the Russian fairy tale, Mabel convinces herself that the child is theirs, that she was borne of hope and snow. But, however mysterious, the Snow Child does have a very real history of her own, and is as untamable and foreign as the Alaskan wilderness itself. The story is tense and moving, as the reader must come to wish for the best possible outcome for Jack and Mabel, yet can’t shake the worry that there isn’t something to the warnings inherent in that fairy tale, after all. This book was strange, entrancing, and masterfully told. A new favorite!

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Unfortunately, Galore broke my winning streak. It had so much potential, too. An interesting departure…a pale man found alive in the belly of a whale beached upon the coast of newly settled Newfoundland, whose mute presence has inexplicable effects the people who find him…an intriguingly convoluted family tree and feud that survives multiple generations…and complex mythological undertones drawn from folklore and Methodism. While the idea behind this book was magnificent, and I was really looking forward to it, I found Crummey’s writing dry and his recounting of events tedious. I felt that the constant reference to the relationships between successive generations of the townspeople drew my attention away from what I found magical about the world he’d constructed. All the pieces were there; I wished he’d spent more time on plot, on playing around within the world he’d created, than reinforcing it’s boundaries and contents. I loved the dark mystery that pervaded the novel. I did not love the energy I had to expend on keeping names and eras in place and, personally, I would have liked the second half to have been more concise, with clearer intent. Oh, well.

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8 Responses

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  1. What an interesting bunch! I’ve been eyeing Caramelo so many times, but I always leave it at the library, the size intimidates me. The whale thing is ummm..slightly disgusting, but the mystery aspect sounds great. Birds of a lesser paradise definitely goes on my list and How onderful that you loved Rebecca! I’m always pushing that one on people. Just read Vera by von Arnim, which interestingly is also about the lingering presence of a first wife :)

    Bina

    February 6, 2013 at 8:20 pm

    • I think Caramelo is worth it, it reads more quickly than you might expect! The whale thing IS disgusting, I left out most of the nasty details, but there are lots :/ I hope you do read Birds of a Lesser Paradise…I’d love another perspective! And I hadn’t heard of Vera, but now of course I’m definitely interested.

      Emily Jane

      February 12, 2013 at 10:35 pm

  2. YAY to your response to Rebecca. Isn’t it the greatest? I reread it all the time, and it stands up to, I can report, a LARGE number of rereads. The writing is so beautifully creepy, in a way that I adore but rarely, rarely see elsewhere. Basically just Rebecca and Shirley Jackson books.

    Jenny

    February 8, 2013 at 1:08 am

    • Yes, IT’S THE GREATEST! So great. I know exactly what you mean about the writing being “beautifully creepy” and I feel the same way about it. Shirley Jackson will appear in my next round of short reviews :)

      Emily Jane

      February 12, 2013 at 10:37 pm

  3. I have the Snow Child and Birds of a Lesser Paradise on my shelves, and I started reading Caramelo years ago but didn’t get to finish it. Such good stuff that I can’t wait to dive into!

    Andi (@estellasrevenge)

    February 10, 2013 at 2:50 am

  4. Rebecca is wonderful isn’t it I ve a recent version which I love because it was a present from my brother ,all the best stu

    winstonsdad

    February 11, 2013 at 4:39 pm


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